Environmental Studies Faculty

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David Anderson

Photo of  David  Anderson
Paul G. Blazer Professor of Economics Economics Phone: 859.238.5282 Website: Personal Website Website: Education Station Website: "The Cost of Crime," in Foundations and Trends® in Microeconomics (PDF)
Biography

David A. Anderson came to Centre College in 1992, and was named the Blazer Professor of Economics in 2001. He holds a B.A. degree from the University of Michigan, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Duke University.

Dr. Anderson has expertise in the economics of law, crime, and the environment. He has also published scholarly articles on futures markets, ARCH models, marriage, social insurance, classroom technology, instructional evaluation, childbirth, and dispute resolution, among other topics. His 12 books cover the topics of dispute resolution, environmental economics, active learning, and introductory economics.

Dr. Anderson’s consulting work includes economic impact studies and expert witness testimony on the value of life and lost earnings.

Email: d.anderson@centre.edu

File last updated: 5/2/13

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EXPERT: Economics of law, crime, or the environment — The diminishment of fathers — Deterrent effects of crime and capital punishment — Sources of the solid waste problem — The dating process

Grant-supported research on legal policy, dispute resolution, environmental economics, and the economics of crime. To read about Anderson’s recent speaking engagement on the economics of crime, click here. See personal Web page for a list of 25 articles and books. Student-assisted research includes studies of the aggregate burden of crime, new settlement-encouraging legal rules, the sources of our solid waste problem, and innovative teaching, active learning, and evaluation systems.

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Daniel Kirchner

Photo of  Daniel  Kirchner
Assistant Professor of Philosophy Philosophy Address Crounse Hall—406 Phone: 859.238.5348
Biography

Daniel Kirchner came to Centre in 2009 as a Visiting Lecturer of Philosophy and began as Assistant Professor of Philosophy in 2010. Prior to completing his Ph.D. in philosophy at Indiana University in 2010, he studied international relations and German as an undergraduate at the Johns Hopkins University, and received a Masters of Theological Studies at Harvard University.

Dr. Kirchner specializes in ethics and 19th-century philosophy—Hegel’s use of ancient views of the self in his ethics in particular. He teaches a range of courses including humanities courses, Philosophy of Religion, Introduction to Ethics, Biomedical Ethics, Ethical Theory, 19th-Century Philosophy, and The Ethics of Food. Kirchner recently published a paper entitled “Augustine’s Use of Epicureanism: Three Paradigmatic Problems for a Theory of Friendship in the Confessions” in International Philosophical Quarterly.

Dr. Kirchner was awarded a Stoghill Research Professorship for the Fall 2013 term to research a book manuscript entitled “Eat Your Values”: The Ethics of Food.

Email: daniel.kirchner@centre.edu

File last updated: 8/22/13

Matthew Klooster

Photo of  Matthew  Klooster
Assistant Professor of Biology Address Young Hall—243 Phone: 859.238.6530
Biography

Before coming to Centre, Klooster was a post-doctoral researcher at Harvard University. His research interests are plant population and community ecology, evolutionary-ecology, symbioses, phylogeography, population genetics, genomics, and conservation of rare and endangered species. Klooster graduated cum laude from Xavier University with a B.S. in biological sciences and earned a Ph.D. in biological sciences from the University of Cincinnati.

Since arriving at Centre, Klooster received a National Science Foundation grant in 2011 in collaboration with Dr. Steven Miller (University of Wyoming) to study highly specialized plant-fungal symbioses. The grant has facilitated research opportunities for Centre students and provided funding for a research/teaching post-doctoral fellow. He was named a Centre Scholar in 2013 and served as director of the Bonner Scholars Program from 2013 until 2016. In 2016, in collaboration with Centre colleagues Kyle Anderson, Danielle Kirchner, and Brett Werner, he received a four-year LIASE Grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to pursue novel pedagogical practices integrating contemporary issues of Asia and the environment.

Email: matthew.klooster@centre.edu

File last updated: 10/11/16

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Staff Congress Representative (2015 — 2016)

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Sarah Lashley

Photo of  Sarah  Lashley
Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning • Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) Address Centre College Crounse Hall, Lower Level Phone: 859.238.6294 Website: Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) Website: Environmental Studies
Biography

Sarah Lashley joined the faculty and staff of Centre College in 2012 as director of the Center for Teaching and Learning and assistant professor of environmental studies.

Prior to joining the Centre College community, she taught in the Environmental Studies Program and Department of Sociology at Colby College in Waterville, Maine as a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Environmental Human Rights. She has also served as an environmental education Peace Corps volunteer in northeastern Ukraine and worked as an instructional consultant for the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching at the University of Michigan.

Her primary research interests are in the areas of collaborative problem-solving, conflict management, environmental inequality, and faculty development. She is particularly interested in identifying and understanding the factors that promote and hinder collaboration. Current projects include: assessing the variations within small college and university faculty development centers, which may be masked by virtue of our institutional banners, that have the potential to influence collaboration; and, understanding how the characteristics of environmental justice conflicts have bearing on the structure, management, and functioning of collaborative processes.

At Centre, she teaches environmental conflict management, alternative dispute resolution, urban sustainability, environmental justice, and introductory sociology courses.

She earned her M.S and Ph.D. degrees in natural resources and environment from the University of Michigan, and a B.A. with honors in environmental studies from Allegheny College.

Email: sarah.lashley@centre.edu

File last updated: 11/03/14

Anne E. Lubbers

Photo of  Anne E. Lubbers
Professor of Biology Biology Address Young Hall—223 Phone: 859.238.5321
Biography

Anne Lubbers is professor of biology at Centre College, where she has taught since 1993.

A plant ecologist, Lubbers has special expertise on factors affecting seed production. Her work has been published in professional journals, including the American Journal of Botany and Ecology.

Lubbers provides her Centre students opportunities for collaborative research. For the last five years she has studied reproductive success in wild ginseng. One or two students work with her each summer as they visit eight forest populations throughout Kentucky of this increasingly uncommon species. One of those students, Karen Trowbridge, subsequently was awarded third place in the biology poster competition at the joint annual meeting of the Tennessee and Kentucky Academy of Sciences in the fall of 2001. This summer Lubbers will continue the process of studying how soil conditions, sunlight, and pollination affect the plant’s ability to produce seed.

Lubbers says of such field work for students: “Whatever field our students go on to pursue, they gain some really important basic skills in this program—how to be organized in collecting data, the importance of being careful when recording numbers or doing lab work, how to interpret the information obtained, how to use a computer for graphing and—especially—how to think logically and concisely.”

Lubbers is a member of the Botanical Society of America, the Kentucky Native Plant Society, the Ecological Society of America, and the Southern Appalachian Botanical Society. She holds a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and a Ph.D. from Duke University.

Email: anne.lubbers@centre.edu

File last updated: 8/5/13

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EXPERT

Botany — Plant reproductive ecology — Invasive plants

A plant ecologist with expertise on factors affecting seed production in native plants. Articles published in the American Journal of Botany. Regularly involves her Centre students in collaborative research. Most recent work is on American ginseng; Lubbers and her students are studying how water availability, sunlight, and pollination affect the plant’s ability to produce seed. Interested in invasive plants and teaches one biannual course on plant-herbivore interactions.

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Daniel L. Manheim

Photo of  Daniel L. Manheim
H.W. Stodghill, Jr. and Adele H. Stodghill Professor of English English Address Crounse Hall—446 Phone: 859.238.5325
Biography

Daniel Manheim is professor of English at Centre College, where he has taught since 1991. He has held the Stodghill Professorship for English since 2007.

Manheim has a scholarly background in American literature, and he has taught Centre courses on major American writers, environmental literature, American autobiography, and the modern short story. He has pursued research on American historian and philosopher Henry Adams and poet Emily Dickinson, among others, and his articles have appeared in such publications as The New England Quarterly, ESQ, and Literary Imagination.  He is on the board of directors of The Emily Dickinson International Society, and he edits the EDIS Bulletin.

Prior to joining the Centre faculty, Manheim was a visiting professor at Bard College and an instructor at Columbia University and Barnard College.

Manheim holds an A.B. from Amherst College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia.

Email: dan.manheim@centre.edu

File last updated: 3/18/14

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EXPERT: American literature — The life and writings of Henry Adams — American autobiography

Scholarly background in American Literature. Has taught major American writers, African-American literature, American autobiography, and poetry. Expertise on American historian and philosopher Henry Adams.

J. Preston Miles

Photo of  J. Preston  Miles
John C. Walkup Professor of Chemistry Chemistry Address Olin Hall—218 Phone: 859.238.5414 Website: Personal Website:
Biography

Preston Miles is professor of chemistry at Centre College, where he has taught since 1981. He has held the Walkup Professorship of Chemistry since 1997, and has served as chair of the natural science program.

Miles is an analytical chemist who worked in research and development in private industry before joining the Centre faculty. He is deeply committed to getting Centre students involved in collaborative research. His research has focused on the development and application of methods for trace level analyses. Current projects include the determination of toxic heavy metals in woody plant materials, the determination of cortisol in urine and feces from both captive and wild wooly monkey populations, and most recently, the determination of PPCP’s in surface waters.

The PPCP compounds (pharmaceutical and personal care products) represent a category of potential environmental concern. Recent discoveries (Science News, April 2000, Environmental Science and Technology, February 2002) suggest that these compounds occur at levels and frequencies much higher than previously anticipated. Miles and his student collaborators are currently working on developing and validating sample preparation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for some of these compounds.

Miles has developed a number of successful grant proposals on behalf of the sciences at Centre. He holds a B.A. from Centre and earned a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the University of Kentucky.

Email: preston.miles@centre.edu

File last updated: 8/5/13

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EXPERT: Analytical chemistry — Trace level analysis — Science education and importance of basic research

An analytical chemist who worked in research and development in private industry before joining the Centre faculty. Deeply committed to collaborative research bringing together students and faculty. Recent research with a Centre student investigating how temperature affects the solubility of a form of carbon molecule known as carbon 60 or C-60 (“fullerenes”). He has developed a number of successful grant proposals on behalf of the sciences at Centre.

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A. Endre Nyerges

Photo of  A. Endre Nyerges
Professor of Anthropology Anthropology Address Crounse Hall—453 Phone: 859.238.5240
Biography

Endre Nyerges joined the Centre College faculty in 1997 as a visiting professor, having previously taught at the University of Kentucky. He was named associate professor of anthropology the following year and became professor of anthropology in 2007. He has chaired Anthropology/Sociology and Environmental Studies and is an active member of both major programs.

A veteran of ethnological and ecological field research in Iran and Sierra Leone, Nyerges has edited two volumes of scholarly work in anthropology and has published extensively in scholarly books and journals. His current research concerns the remote sensing of environmental change in West African Guinea savanna.

Nyerges holds a B.A. from Earlham College, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

Email: endre.nyerges@centre.edu

File last updated: 10/20/14

Notes

EXPERT

Cultural anthropology — Food production in Africa

Editor of The Ecology of Practice: Studies of Food Crop Production in Sub-Saharan West Africa (Gordon and Breach, 1998), part of a series. Research on ethnography and ecology in Africa and the Middle East.

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Brett Werner

Photo of  Brett  Werner
Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies • Chair of the Environmental Studies Program Environmental Studies Address Crounse Hall—318 Phone: 859.238.6502
Biography

Brett Werner returned to Centre in 2013 as assistant professor of Environmental Studies after spending two years at Centre as an Associated Colleges of the South/Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Environmental Studies from 2009-2011. He was named a Centre Scholar in 2017.

Werner teaches widely in Environmental Studies, including the core Introductory and Senior Seminar courses, along with disciplinary courses in Environmental Policy and Environmental Ethics. His topical courses include Thailand, Aquaculture, and the Environment; Rivers and Adaptive Ecosystem Management; and the Human Dimensions of Climate Change. Since 2014, Werner and his colleagues have received two grants from the Henry Luce Initiative for Asian Studies and the Environment totaling $450,000 to develop a number of learning experiences that scaffold High Impact Practices, from language and culture to study abroad and research and internships abroad.

Werner’s research addresses a number of emerging environmental issues, including the effects of climate change on prairie wetlands, wetland and grassland restoration, floodplain forests, and most recently the interplay of science and policy on the topic of wetland conservation and agricultural drainage. His research has been funded by a number of federal agencies, and he has published in BioScience, Climatic Change, and the Journal of the American Water Resources Association. His current research project investigates human relationships with rivers, streams, and water.

He received a B.A. from Saint Olaf College in mathematics and models of the environment, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in rhetoric and scientific & technical communications from the University of Minnesota.

Email: brett.werner@centre.edu

File last updated: 5/18/17

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