Politics Faculty

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Dina Badie

Photo of  Dina  Badie
Assistant Professor of Politics and International Studies • Chair of the International Studies Program International Studies, Politics Address Crounse Hall—447 Phone: 859.238.5770
Biography

Dina Badie joined Centre’s faculty in 2012 as assistant professor of government and international studies. She was named a Centre Scholar in 2015, a two-year appointment recognizing teaching excellence, scholarship, and contributions to the Centre community.

Her research and teaching interests include International Relations Theory, Security Studies, Middle East & East Asian Politics, Oil Politics, and Foreign Policy. Her work has been published in Foreign Policy Analysis, International Studies Perspective, and The Routledge Handbook of American Foreign Policy.

Badie received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in political science from the University of Connecticut.

Email: dina.badie@centre.edu

File last updated: 6/05/15

Robert Bosco

Photo of  Robert  Bosco
Associate Professor of International Studies International Studies
Biography

Robert Bosco is associate professor of international studies, joining Centre in 2010. He was named a Centre Scholar in 2014. Before this, he was a 2009-2010 Research Fellow in Religion and International Affairs at Harvard University’s JFK School of Government. Bosco’s areas of expertise include international relations theory, religion and international politics, and international law. His research focuses on the relationship between religion and the state. He explored these themes in his 2014 book, Securing the Sacred: Religion, National Security, and the Western State (University of Michigan Press.) Dr. Bosco has also published articles about the study of Religion in International Relations, Critical Theory and Religion, and Buddhism and Politics. He is currently a Research Associate for the Center for Critical Research on Religion.

Robert’s previous work has appeared in the International Political Science Review, the Journal of International Relations and Development, and the International Studies Encyclopedia.

In 2014, Bosco’s book Securing the Sacred: Religion, Security, and the Western State was published by the University of Michigan Press.

At Centre, Robert teaches courses in international relations, religion and international politics, international law, international political economy, and European politics.

Robert received his B.A. in philosophy from Wheaton College in Massachusetts, his M.A. in international politics from the School of International Service at American University, and his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Connecticut.

Email: robert.bosco@centre.edu

File last updated: 09/7/16

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Lori Hartmann

Photo of  Lori  Hartmann
Frank B. and Virginia B. Hower Professor of International Studies International Studies Address Crounse Hall—463 Phone: 859.238.5250
Biography

Lori Hartmann joined the Centre College faculty in 1999. She was awarded the “Rookie of the Year” teaching award in 2000, and a Kirk Teaching Award in 2003. Since 2009 she has held the Frank B. and Virginia B. Hower endowed chair in international studies. During the CentreTerms of 2004, 2009, 2011, and 2015 she took groups of students to Cameroon to study politics and civil society in that Central African country. And In 2006-07 and 2012, she was the director of Centre College’s program in Strasbourg, France.

Hartmann’s scholarly interests have focused on African politics, women and development in West Africa, and the political economy of development. In 2013, she co-published an article with former Centre student Brian Klosterboer in African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review on the prospects for peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. She has published several articles on the topic of women and development, including: “Pounding Millet during School Hours: obstacles to girls’ formal education in Niger” in the European Journal of Development Research (2011); “The Rural-Urban dynamic and implications for development: perspectives from Nigerien Women” in Journal of Contemporary African Studies (spring 2004) and “A Language of their own: Development Discourse in Niger” in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Winter 2004). Hartmann-Mahmud has also published works on pedagogical issues, for example, “Neoliberalism: a useful tool for teaching critical topics in political science” appeared in PS: Political Science and Politics (Oct 2009). In 2002 her article “War as Metaphor” appeared in Peace Review: Journal of Social Justice.

In 2015-16, Hartmann spent a year in Ethiopia as a Fulbright Fellow at Wollo University conducting a comparative study of Nigerian and Ethiopian literature, with an aim of understanding how that literature reflects a sense of nationalism or national identity. Read more about her research here. Upon her return in the fall of 2016, she took over a three-year term as faculty president.

Hartmann has written op-ed pieces for the Lexington Herald-Leader on issues such as Operation Iraqi Freedom and the African refugee crisis in Europe.

She holds a B.A. from Denison University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Denver. She was an Ambassadorial Graduate Rotary Scholar at the Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Senegal, West Africa; and a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer in Niger, West Africa.

Hartmann is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, and has served as the Treasurer and President of Centre’s Phi Beta Kappa chapter.

Email: lori.hartmann-mahmud@centre.edu

File last updated: 04/11/2016

Notes

EXPERT

African politics — Women and development in West Africa — Democratic transitions in Africa — Peace Corps

Former Peace Corps volunteer in Tahoua, Niger, West Africa. An Ambassadorial Graduate Rotary Scholar in Senegal, West Africa. Articles published in journals including Africa Today.

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Benjamin Knoll

Photo of  Benjamin  Knoll
John Marshall Harlan Associate Professor of Politics Politics Address Crounse Hall—462 Phone: 859.238.5281 Website: personal website
Biography

Benjamin Knoll came to Centre in 2010 as assistant professor of government, and was named a Centre Scholar in 2013. He was appointed John Marshall Harlan Associate Professor of Politics in 2016.

Knoll’s area of expertise is American politics with a specialization in public opinion and voting behavior, specifically, race and politics, religion and politics, and political psychology.

He was a regional finalist for the 2014 Kentucky Secretary of State Outstanding Civic Education Leadership Award. He is the director of the “Boyle County Exit Poll” and “Colonel’s Canvass Survey,” which are “experiential learning” projects for students in his courses.

Knoll’s research has been published in The Journal of Politics, Political Behavior, Social Science Research, Research and Politics, Social Science Quarterly, American Politics Research, PS: Politics Science and Politics, Psychological Reports, and International Migration Review

Knoll graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. in political science from Utah State University, and earned a M.A. and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Iowa.

Email: benjamin.knoll@centre.edu

File last updated: 4/20/16

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Jennapher Lunde Seefeldt

Photo of  Jennapher  Lunde Seefeldt
Visiting Assistant Professor of Politics & International Studies Centre College Address Crounse Hall—323 Phone: 859.238.6236
Biography

Jennapher Lunde Seefeldt joined the Centre College faculty in 2016 as visiting assistant professor of politics & international studies.

Lunde Seefeldt researches the factors that influence levels of democracy or hybridity within countries. Her particular interest is freedom of expression rights and the representation of marginalized populations, and how these freedoms vary with changing levels of democracy. She also studies numerous economic structures (especially state control over natural resources) and how these influence politics. While her region of focus has been Latin America, she plans to continue studying her favorite topics in other regions of the world, as well.

Lunde Seefeldt earned a B.A. in government/international affairs from Augustana College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from Northeastern University.

Email: j.lundeseefeldt@centre.edu

File last updated: 8/8/2016

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Chris Paskewich

Photo of  Chris  Paskewich
Associate Professor of Politics • Chair of the Politics Program Politics Address Crounse Hall—324 Phone: 859.238.5239
Biography

Christopher Paskewich joined Centre’s faculty in 2009. He is an associate professor of government, and was named a Centre Scholar in 2012.

His teaching interests include political philosophy, political ideology, American political thought, and political economy. He has recently done research in ancient Greek political thought and in Catholic political theology. He is currently researching the Federalist papers, as well as recent Marxist reactions to terrorism.

Paskewich received a B.S. in mathematics and philosophy and a M.S. in economics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He earned a M.A and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Connecticut.

Email: c.paskewich@centre.edu

File last updated: 8/27/15

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Daniel G. Stroup

Photo of  Daniel G. Stroup
Pierce and Amelia Harrington Lively Professor of Politics and Law • Pre-law Advisor Politics Address Crounse Hall—471 Phone: 859.238.5246
Biography

Daniel Stroup has taught at Centre College since 1976 and was named the Lively Professor of Government and Law in 2005.

Stroup’s teaching and research interests encompass American political history, the judicial process, the legislative process, and The Civil Rights Movement in America. Along with Professor Bill Garriott, Stroup teaches a unique government course that simulates the U.S. Congress. Centre students have the opportunity to play the roles of congressmen in the House of Representatives, cabinet members, lobbyists or journalists, and one student portrays the President. Stroup also teaches a seminar on the history of The Civil Rights Movement.

Stroup has published articles in journals including Valparaiso Law Review and PS: Political Science and Politics, as well as a segment of The Kentucky Encyclopedia.

Stroup graduated magna cum laude from the University of Dayton (B.A.) and holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in government from the University of Virginia.

In the greater Danville community, he has been active in the parents association of the Danville Montessori School, and Citizens Concerned for Human Relations, a local group that focuses on race relations.

Email: dan.stroup@centre.edu

File last updated: 8/8/13

Notes

EXPERT: American political history — The judicial process — The legislative process — The Civil Rights movement in America — The Supreme Court

Teaching and research interests encompass American political history, the judicial process, the legislative process, and the Civil Rights movement in America. Team teaches (with professor William Garriott) a government course that simulates the U.S. Congress. Has published articles in journals including Valparaiso Law Review and PS: Political Science and Politics, as well as a segment of The Kentucky Encyclopedia.

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