Bo McMillin ’22 inducted into the Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame

Posted by Centre News in Alumni, Athletics, News 20 Jun 2013

c6h0_football_teamFinally, 92 years after his game-changing touchdown against Harvard University, Centre student and quarterback Bo McMillin ’22 has been inducted into the Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame.

McMillin looms large as a hallowed legend in Centre lore: during the 1921 match against then-undefeated Harvard University, McMillin managed the only touchdown of the game, what The New York Times hailed 50 years later as “football’s upset of the century.”

The Praying Colonels’ victory put Centre College, a mostly unknown Kentucky school, on the national stage as a football powerhouse and birthed the famous “C6-H0” that remains on one of Centre’s brick walls as a testament to the upset.

At the Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame induction ceremony, McMillin’s daughter, Jane McMillin Bubier, was thankful to the Kentucky Athletic Association for recognizing her father’s contribution to the sport.

“It makes me both happy and proud to know that my father’s accomplishments are still remembered almost a century after he scored the touchdown that enabled Centre to beat Harvard,” she said. “I’m proud of all he did for us, for Centre, for Kentucky and for football.”

McMillin’s Centre connection did not end with his famous touchdown. His daughter Jane’s son Bruce Bubier attended Centre as well, graduating in 1980.

c6h0Bubier never knew Bo, but he has amassed memorabilia surrounding him and his famous Centre victory for years. He has a collection of rare historic photos and newspaper clippings, including a piece of the Wheaties cereal box Bo was featured on in the late 1930s.

Bubier explains that McMillin’s fame lasted decades after the historic Centre-Harvard match. In the early 1950’s, when McMillin fell ill with stomach cancer, his family received letters from all over the country with nothing more of an address than “Bo McMillin, Indiana.”

Bubier feels McMillin’s induction is a worthy tribute to his achievements.

“Back in those days, pro football didn’t exist, college football was all there was,” he said. “So it makes sense that the Centre-Harvard game was so important. When you remember that his touchdown defeated the reigning national champions who had gone undefeated for five years, you realize it is definitely something worth honoring in a big way.”

Bubier’s mother Jane hopes that the family’s Centre connection continues to grow.

“Four of my grandsons are still in high school, and I hope that at least one of them will choose Centre as the next step in his education,” she said.

By Mariel Smith

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