Centre hosts Frank X Walker convocation and Literary Festival, Sept. 18-20

Posted by Centre News in Convocation 15 Sep 2014

walker_frank_xAs part of its commitment to cultivate campus discussions on diversity and inclusion, Centre College will join with community partners to host the Frank X Walker Literary Festival on Sept. 19 and 20. Co-sponsored by the Citizens Concerned for Human Relations group, Danville City Schools and the Boyle County Public Library, the festival will feature presentations and community readings by thirty noted Kentucky authors, including Kentucky Poet Laureate Frank X Walker.

Walker will begin the festival Thursday evening with a reading from his book of poetry Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers, which was selected as the first-year book for Centre’s Class of 2018. In this collection, Walker illustrates the importance of renowned civil rights activist Medgar Evers. The reading takes place in Newlin Hall at 7:30 p.m. and is free and open to the community.

A native of Danville, Walker earned a bachelor’s degree in English and a master of fine arts in writing from the University of Kentucky. Among his many accomplishments, Walker is a Kentucky Arts Council Al Smith Fellowship recipient, past executive director of the Kentucky’s Governor’s School for the Arts and was recently named the 2013-2014 Kentucky poet laureate. He is noted for creating the term “Affrilachia” to unify Appalachian and African-American culture and history.

The Frank X Walker Literary Festival is part of Centre’s yearlong series of events commemorating the 50th anniversary of the civil rights movement, funded by a Created Equal grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle will bring four outstanding films on the civil rights movement to select locations across the United States. These documentaries, followed by community discussion sessions, will provide a unique opportunity for students and community members alike to reflect on issues of racial equality in modern society.

Related public programming will continue throughout the academic year.

by Amy Clark Wise

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