Centre College Class of 2018 sets new records

Posted by Centre News in Academics, Admission, News 07 May 2014

crounse_fallWith the May 1 National Candidates Reply Date for high school seniors now past, data for the Centre College Class of 2018 reveals historic results in a number of key areas.

According to Bob Nesmith, Centre’s dean of admission and student financial planning, the new group of first-year students will “set records for size, quality, geographic reach and diversity.”

Current enrollment deposits of 391, for instance, are an all-time high. This largest-ever incoming class is part of a strategic plan to achieve measured and modest growth on a path to an overall enrollment of 1,425 students no later than 2016. Current enrollment stands at 1,375.

The academic profile of the incoming class exhibits the same strength Centre has enjoyed in recent years. With a midrange of 26 to 31, the average ACT score is 29, which is yet another record achievement. As well, 54 percent of the new students ranked in the top 10 percent of their graduating class, although Nesmith cautions that fewer students attend high schools that report class rank.

The incoming class also helps expand Centre’s geographic reach. It has new students from four countries and 36 states, including six states not currently represented: Idaho, Maine, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oregon and Rhode Island. When classes begin in the fall, the total number of states represented will be 45, along with six countries.

The 33 new international students will represent eight percent of the incoming class and arrive from China, India, South Korea and Vietnam. Current international students at Centre hail from these countries, in addition to Germany and Myanmar.

Nesmith also points out that campus diversity will grow with the Class of 2018. “Of students who report race, and nearly all do,” he says, “24 percent report a race other than white, including 17 percent of domestic students.”

Finally, bucking a national trend that sees more women attending college than men—and this is true of private colleges in particular—the incoming class at Centre is nearly evenly split between male and female.

by Michael Strysick

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail