Expert Listing

 

Use the directory below to search for contact information relevant to the Centre community. Should you not find the necessary information, please contact us using the main number listed below.

Main Number:

The main number for Centre College is 859.238.5200. Calls to this number will be routed to the appropriate extension. In an after-hours emergency, call 859.236.4357.

Mailing Address:

Centre College
600 West Walnut Street
Danville, KY 40422

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T V W Y Z

A

David Anderson

Photo of  David  Anderson
Paul G. Blazer Professor of Economics Economics Work Crounse—448 Work Phone: 859.238.5282 Website: Personal Website Website: Education Station Website: "The Cost of Crime," in Foundations and Trends® in Microeconomics (PDF)
Biography

David A. Anderson came to Centre College in 1992, and was named the Blazer Professor of Economics in 2001. He holds a B.A. degree from the University of Michigan, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Duke University.

Dr. Anderson has expertise in the economics of law, crime, and the environment. He has also published scholarly articles on futures markets, ARCH models, marriage, social insurance, classroom technology, instructional evaluation, childbirth, and dispute resolution, among other topics. His 12 books cover the topics of dispute resolution, environmental economics, active learning, and introductory economics.

Dr. Anderson’s consulting work includes economic impact studies and expert witness testimony on the value of life and lost earnings.

Email: d.anderson@centre.edu

File last updated: 5/2/13

Notes

EXPERT: Economics of law, crime, or the environment — The diminishment of fathers — Deterrent effects of crime and capital punishment — Sources of the solid waste problem — The dating process

Grant-supported research on legal policy, dispute resolution, environmental economics, and the economics of crime. To read about Anderson’s recent speaking engagement on the economics of crime, click here. See personal Web page for a list of 25 articles and books. Student-assisted research includes studies of the aggregate burden of crime, new settlement-encouraging legal rules, the sources of our solid waste problem, and innovative teaching, active learning, and evaluation systems.

Stephen E. Asmus

Photo of  Stephen E. Asmus
H.W. Stodghill, Jr. and Adele H. Stodghill Professor of Biology and Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Work Young Hall—123 Work Phone: 859.238.5318 Website: Personal Webpage
Biography

Steve Asmus is H.W. Stodghill, Jr. and Adele H. Stodghill Professor of Biology and Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. He has taught in the biology and biochemistry/molecular biology programs since 1996. He received the Kirk Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2001 and again in 2016, and was named a Centre Scholar in 2011. Prior to joining the college, he held a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Neurosciences at Case Western Reserve University.

Asmus has special expertise in the field of developmental neurobiology, which focuses on how the brain develops. He describes his research as a study of the development of neurons, which are specialized types of cells found in the nervous system. The neurons produce chemicals known as neurotransmitters that make it possible for the neurons to communicate with each other.

Asmus is interested in how neurons produce the correct neurotransmitter during development. He has analyzed the neurotransmitters produced in developing sympathetic neurons, addressing the question of whether different target tissues influence this “decision” process during development.

Currently, Asmus is studying the neurotransmitters that are produced in the cerebral cortex of the developing and adult brain to examine whether some cortical neurons may change the neurotransmitter that they produce as they mature. Asmus uses a variety of cell staining and microscopy techniques in his laboratory research.

Asmus encourages Centre students to collaborate with him on research. His recent collaborators, all biochemistry and molecular biology majors, include Kaylind Batey ’17, Serena Gale-Butto ’17, Shannon Murray ’17, and Lexie Szalanczy ’18.

Asmus has published his research in journals including the Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy (2016), Brain Research (2008 and 2011), and the Journal of Neuroscience (2000). Asmus co-authored these research articles with numerous student collaborators.

Asmus earned a B.S. degree from Cleveland State University and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, and conducted a postdoctoral fellowship in neuroscience at Case Western Reserve University before coming to Centre.

Email: steve.asmus@centre.edu

File last updated: 10/23/14

Notes

EXPERT: Cloning — Stem cells — Developmental neurobiology — Research on the development of neurons and neurotransmitters — Analysis of neurotransmitters, sympathetic neurons, and target tissues

Special expertise in the field of developmental neurobiology. Research on the neurotransmitters produced in interneurons of the cerebral cortex during development. Asmus frequently collaborates with students on his research. He has authored professional papers for journals including Brain Research and Developmental Biology.

B

C

Stanley R. Campbell

Photo of  Stanley R. Campbell
Director of Library Services Crounse Hall, Grace Doherty Library Work Crounse Hall, Grace Doherty Library Work Phone: 859.238.5271
Biography
Notes

EXPERT: Libraries and library automation — Popular culture, including American film and cinema history — Blues, jazz, and rock ‘n’ roll music — The Patriot Act — Detective fiction — Classic horror literature

Director of the Grace Doherty Library at Centre College since 1981, managing library growth and automation. Articulate about the balancing act between traditional library holdings and the move toward electronic sources. Strong interest in trends in popular culture, including theater, film, and jazz.

D

Mary Blythe Daniels

Photo of  Mary Blythe Daniels
H.W. Stodghill, Jr. and Adele H. Stodghill Professor of Spanish • Chair of Gender Studies Program (fall term) Spanish, European Studies Work Crounse Hall—450 Work Phone: 859.238.5265
Biography

Mary Daniels is H. W. Stodghill, Jr. and Adele H. Stodghill professor of Spanish at Centre College, where she has taught since 1996. She was named a Centre Scholar in 2008.

Her teaching interests include U.S. Latino literature and border studies, as well as 17th-century Spanish literature. Daniels is an advocate of service learning in the classroom and her students routinely work in elementary schools, at literacy centers, and at North Point Training Facility helping with ESL classes. In 2004, Daniels received a grant from the 3M Foundation which was used to start a community center for Hispanics in Central Kentucky where she is co-director.

Daniels earned a B.A. at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, completed an M.A. at the University of Wisconsin, and received a Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky in 1998. She has taught Spanish in a variety of places, including the University of Kentucky, High Point University, and Guilford College.

During the 1998 fall term, Daniels served as the first resident teacher for Centre’s international program in Latin America. She taught and supervised a group of 15 Centre students in Quito, Ecuador, for the term.

Daniels received the McCrary Award as an outstanding graduate student at the University of Kentucky. She has pursued advanced research and made scholarly presentations delving into the role of women in the theater in 17th-century Spain.

Email: mary.daniels@centre.edu

File last updated: 6/26/17

Notes

EXPERT: Modern languages — Theater in 17th century Spain

Has taught Spanish in a variety of settings. Advanced research and scholarly presentations delving into the role of women in the theater in 17th century Spain. Resident director of Centre’s program in Ecuador during fall 1998.

Mark de Araujo

Photo of  Mark  de Araujo
Technical Director for Norton Center for the Arts, Associate Professor of Dramatic Arts Centre CollegeNorton Center for the Arts Work Phone: 859.238.5435
Biography

Mark de Araujo (pronounced duh-rooz-jo) is associate professor of dramatic arts, and technical director of the Norton Center for the Arts at Centre College.
De Araujo does much of his teaching at Centre on a one-to-one basis, instructing and supervising students as they develop the sound, lighting, and technical direction for drama productions. He introduces students to emerging techniques for utilizing computers and other technology as tools in the dramatic arts.
In his role as technical director of the Norton Center for the Arts, de Araujo is responsible for the technical needs of the college’s Norton Center for the Arts. The Norton Center is a major performing arts venue and mounts an annual subscription series that brings to campus performers such as violinist Itzhak Perlman, soprano Kathleen Battle, and trumpeter Wynton Marsalis; as well as touring Broadway productions, major dance companies, and symphony orchestras. Through de Araujo, Centre students have the opportunity to learn about technical needs of arts centers and the technical side of arts management.
De Araujo holds a B.F.A. from the University of Florida and an M.A. degree from Indiana University. He has done design and tech work for the Brown County Playhouse, Indiana University, the Hippodrome Theatre, and Raintree Harvest dance troop. De Araujo joined the Centre faculty in 1979.

Email: dearaujo@centre.edu

Notes

EXPERT: Computer assisted drafting (CAD) in theatre design — Technical needs of performing arts centers

Regularly teaches classes in technical aspects of theater, including set and stage design, lighting, and sound. Introduces students to emerging techniques for utilizing computers and other technology as tools in the dramatic arts. Computer assisted design (CAD) for theater.

Stephanie Dew

Photo of  Stephanie  Dew
Professor of Biology and Biochemistry & Molecular Biology • Chair of Biology Program Biology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Work Young Hall—120 Work Phone: 859.238.5316 Website: Personal website:
Biography

Stephanie Dew is a professor of biology at Centre College, where she has taught since 1994. Dew was named a Centre Scholar in 2009, and has served as chair of the biochemistry & molecular biology program. Her teaching assignments are concentrated in biochemistry and molecular biology, including courses in biomolecular architecture and biochemical pathways.

Dew has pursued research since her own undergraduate days at Centre, focusing on the proteins and enzymes required for the transport and metabolism of vitamin A, especially in freshwater fish. In 1997, she received a grant from the Teagle Foundation for research at King’s College of the University of London. Dew worked with a team investigating the role of vitamin A in development.

At Centre, Dew seeks to involve her students in research. In her first four years at the college, she has directed seven independent study-research projects, including two students chosen for Centre’s prestigious John C. Young Scholars program. Brad Eilerman, a Centre student who collaborated with Dew on a summer research, won first place in the undergraduate division of the Kentucky Academic of Science for his presentation of the research.

An innovative teacher, Dew has been at the forefront of efforts to obtain and appropriately use technology in Centre’s science classes.

She earned a B.A. at Centre, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, and completed a Ph.D. at Vanderbilt University, where she was a University Graduate Fellow.

Email: stephanie.dew@centre.edu

File last updated: 5/2/13

Notes

EXPERT: Undergraduate instruction in biochemistry and biomolecular biology — Web as a tool in undergraduate science — Research on vitamin A metabolism

Long-term research on the proteins and enzymes required for the transport and metabolism of vitamin A, especially in freshwater fish. Role of vitamin A in development. Collaborative research with students — two John C. Young Scholars in four years.

Kay Drake

Photo of  Kay  Drake
Vice President of Human Resources and Administrative Services Work Centre College Horky House 101 North Maple Avenue Danville KY 40422 Work Phone: 859.238.5467
Biography

Kay is vice president of human resources and administrative services at Centre College, where she has worked since 1997. She has been instrumental in developing an employee handbook, a supervisor policy manual, a salary compensation program for staff, and the employee recognition program at the college.

As the Title IX Coordinator at Centre, she coordinates compliance efforts to carry out the College’s responsibilities under Title IX, as well as those under Section 504 and other applicable non-discrimination laws.

Notes

EXPERT: Employee health insurance — Sexual harassment policies — Employee benefits — Leaves of absence (Family Medical Leave Act) — Employee wellness — Employee grievances or discipline — Employee recognition awards

F

Michael Fabritius

Photo of  Michael  Fabritius
Professor of Economics Economics Work Crounse Hall—442 Work Phone: 859.238.5461
Biography

Michael Fabritius is a professor of economics. Prior to joining Centre’s faculty in 2006, he was McBryde Professor of Finance and Economics at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor.

Dr. Fabritius’ scholarly interests include savings and loan industry, economic history, money and banking, and economic education. He has published articles and book chapters on such subjects as “An Evaluation of the Life Cycles of Education Supporting Lotteries,” in Public Finance Review and “The Changing Quality of Business Education,” in Economics of Education Review.

He received a B.A. in economics from S.U.N.Y—Fredonia, a master’s in economics from New Mexico State University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas.

Email: mike.fabritius@centre.edu

File last updated: 5/2/13

H

Lori Hartmann

Photo of  Lori  Hartmann
Frank B. and Virginia B. Hower Professor of International Studies International Studies Work Crounse Hall—463 Work Phone: 859.238.5250
Biography

Lori Hartmann joined the Centre College faculty in 1999. She was awarded the “Rookie of the Year” teaching award in 2000, and a Kirk Teaching Award in 2003. Since 2009 she has held the Frank B. and Virginia B. Hower endowed chair in international studies. During the CentreTerms of 2004, 2009, 2011, and 2015 she took groups of students to Cameroon to study politics and civil society in that Central African country. And In 2006-07 and 2012, she was the director of Centre College’s program in Strasbourg, France.

Hartmann’s scholarly interests have focused on African politics, women and development in West Africa, and the political economy of development. In 2013, she co-published an article with former Centre student Brian Klosterboer in African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review on the prospects for peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. She has published several articles on the topic of women and development, including: “Pounding Millet during School Hours: obstacles to girls’ formal education in Niger” in the European Journal of Development Research (2011); “The Rural-Urban dynamic and implications for development: perspectives from Nigerien Women” in Journal of Contemporary African Studies (spring 2004) and “A Language of their own: Development Discourse in Niger” in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Winter 2004). Hartmann-Mahmud has also published works on pedagogical issues, for example, “Neoliberalism: a useful tool for teaching critical topics in political science” appeared in PS: Political Science and Politics (Oct 2009). In 2002 her article “War as Metaphor” appeared in Peace Review: Journal of Social Justice.

In 2015-16, Hartmann spent a year in Ethiopia as a Fulbright Fellow at Wollo University conducting a comparative study of Nigerian and Ethiopian literature, with an aim of understanding how that literature reflects a sense of nationalism or national identity. Read more about her research here. Upon her return in the fall of 2016, she took over a three-year term as faculty president.

Hartmann has written op-ed pieces for the Lexington Herald-Leader on issues such as Operation Iraqi Freedom and the African refugee crisis in Europe.

She holds a B.A. from Denison University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Denver. She was an Ambassadorial Graduate Rotary Scholar at the Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Senegal, West Africa; and a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer in Niger, West Africa.

Hartmann is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, and has served as the Treasurer and President of Centre’s Phi Beta Kappa chapter.

Email: lori.hartmann-mahmud@centre.edu

File last updated: 04/11/2016

Notes

EXPERT

African politics — Women and development in West Africa — Democratic transitions in Africa — Peace Corps

Former Peace Corps volunteer in Tahoua, Niger, West Africa. An Ambassadorial Graduate Rotary Scholar in Senegal, West Africa. Articles published in journals including Africa Today.

Jessica Hodges

Photo of  Jessica  Hodges
Library Evening Supervisor Centre College Work Phone: 859.238.5279
Biography

J

Bruce K. Johnson

Photo of  Bruce K. Johnson
James Graham Brown Professor of Economics Economics Work Crounse Hall—402 Work Phone: 859.238.5255 Website: More About Professor Johnson
Biography

Bruce K. Johnson is the James Graham Brown Professor of Economics at Centre College, a title he has held since 1992. He joined the college faculty in 1987.

He teaches econometrics, a subject in which he is contributing author for the current (7th) edition of a leading undergraduate textbook, Using Econometrics: A Practical Guide, by A.H. Studenmund. He will be co-author for the 8th and subsequent editions. He also regularly teaches core courses in economic principles and microeconomics and has taught a wide array of field courses, including industrial organization, urban economics, and the economics of sports.

His articles and reviews have been published in academic journals including, among others, Contemporary Economic Policy, Economic Inquiry, Southern Economic Journal, and Journal of Sports Economics, and in book chapters published by Oxford University Press, the Brookings Institution, Syracuse University Press, and others.

He is best known for his research using contingent valuation surveys to estimate the value of civic pride and other public goods sports produce for their communities, filling an important gap in our understanding of public policy issues surrounding subsidies to teams, athletes, and stadiums.

Reporters from media outlets around the nation regularly seek his views on sports economics topics. He has been interviewed by such organizations as ABCNews.com, CNNMoney.com, the Los Angeles Times, the Christian Science Monitor, the Sacramento Bee, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and other newspapers on such topics as stadium economics, antitrust and sports, baseball labor strife, the economics of horse racing, and more.

Johnson has been a contributing columnist for the Lexington Herald-Leader, and his numerous opinion pieces applying economic analysis to current events have appeared in such newspapers as USA Today, the Boston Globe, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the Charlotte Observer, the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, and the Louisville Courier-Journal.

Johnson was visiting professor of economics at the University of Virginia in 2001-02 and again in 2010. During the 1993-94 academic year and during the spring semesters of 2001, 2006, and 2011 he served as resident director of Centre’s overseas program in London. He will direct the London program again in 2018.

He serves as a member of the Consensus Forecasting Group, the nonpartisan panel of economists charged with developing the official forecast of state government revenues for the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

A magna cum laude graduate of Transylvania University, Johnson earned his Ph.D. in economics at the University of Virginia.

Email: bruce.johnson@centre.edu

File last updated: 12/20/16

Notes

EXPERT: Economics of sports, including valuation of sports public goods such as civic and national pride; government subsides of stadiums, professional teams, Olympic teams, and mega-events; and sport labor markets.

Focuses on the economics of sports. His research has been published by Economic Inquiry, Contemporary Economic Policy, Journal of Sports Economics, the Brookings Institution, Syracuse University Press, and Oxford University Press. Special emphasis on valuing civic pride and other intangible benefits due to teams, stadiums, and athletic success. Placements include two USA Today columns, Boston Globe and Atlanta Journal-Constitution columns, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Business Week, Yomiuri Shimbun (Japan), Globe and Mail (Canada).

K

Patrick Kagan-Moore

Photo of  Patrick  Kagan-Moore
Charles T. Hazelrigg Professor of Dramatic Arts Dramatic Arts Work Grant Hall—312 Work Phone: 859.238.5429
Biography

Patrick Kagan-Moore is professor of dramatic arts at Centre College, where he has taught since 1992. He was awarded the Hazelrigg Professorship in Dramatic Arts in 2004.

A teacher and producing theatre artist for more than 35 years, Kagan-Moore teaches a wide range of courses in Centre’s dramatic arts program as well as humanities courses in the college’s general studies program. He regularly directs at least one of Centre’s three major productions each year. Recent successful shows have included Assassins, Buried Child, and Our Country’s Good.

Since his first directing experience in a student production at Oregon State University, Kagan-Moore has directed or acted in nearly 100 productions, including professional, academic, community theatre, opera, and film. His professional directing credits include an Off-Off-Broadway production of Nikolai Gogol’s Marriage in New York City, Macbeth (Central Coast Shakespeare Festival), and Superior Donuts (Athens West Theatre).

His acting roles have included Ahab in Moby Dick, Macduff in Macbeth, and Brian in Joe Egg. Kagan-Moore was a regional finalist in the Irene Ryan Acting Competition, and he received several acting and directing awards from the Bellingham (Wash.) Theatre Guild and Oregon State University.

Kagan-Moore holds a B.S. from Oregon State University, an M.A. from Western Washington University, and a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University.

Email: patrick.kagan-moore@centre.edu

File last updated 1/18/17

Notes

EXPERT

Acting and directing

A veteran of acting and directing for more than 20 years. Recent successes as a director include The Voice of the Prairie, which received the highest possible rating in adjudication at the Kentucky Theater Festival, and Dancing at Lughnasa, which was runner up in the American College Theatre regional competition. Chosen to direct a 1994 Off-Off-Broadway production of Nikolai Gogol’s Marriage.

L

Philip Lockett

Photo of  Philip  Lockett
Professor of Physics Physics Work Olin Hall—13 Work Phone: 859.238.5395
Biography

Philip Lockett is professor of physics at Centre College. He has taught full-time at Centre since 1990 and had prior teaching assignments at the college from 1971-72 and 1980-84. In 2005 he received the Kirk Award for teaching excellence.

Dr. Lockett performs research in the field of astrophysics. He theoretically models astrophysical masers. These are intense beams of radio waves that are the radio frequency analog of lasers. Astrophysical masers are produced in a number of different astrophysical environments, such as star-forming regions, circumstellar envelopes of dying red giant stars, and supernova remnants. Successful modeling of the masers allows the physical conditions in these regions to be discovered. His research has involved Centre students.

He has received grants from the Kentucky Space Grant Consortium and Kentucky EPSCoR to purchase computer hardware and software essential for the conduct of his research. He has presented the results of his research at meetings of the American Astronomical Society and the Kentucky Association of Physics Teachers. He has published the results of his maser research in the Astrophysical Journal.

He received his B.A. in physics from Centre College, an M.S.E. degree in bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Kentucky. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

To read about Dr. Lockett’s published work, click here.

Email: phil.lockett@centre.edu

File last updated: 5/1/13

Anne E. Lubbers

Photo of  Anne E. Lubbers
Professor of Biology Biology Work Young Hall—223 Work Phone: 859.238.5321
Biography

Anne Lubbers is professor of biology at Centre College, where she has taught since 1993.

A plant ecologist, Lubbers has special expertise on factors affecting seed production. Her work has been published in professional journals, including the American Journal of Botany and Ecology.

Lubbers provides her Centre students opportunities for collaborative research. For the last five years she has studied reproductive success in wild ginseng. One or two students work with her each summer as they visit eight forest populations throughout Kentucky of this increasingly uncommon species. One of those students, Karen Trowbridge, subsequently was awarded third place in the biology poster competition at the joint annual meeting of the Tennessee and Kentucky Academy of Sciences in the fall of 2001. This summer Lubbers will continue the process of studying how soil conditions, sunlight, and pollination affect the plant’s ability to produce seed.

Lubbers says of such field work for students: “Whatever field our students go on to pursue, they gain some really important basic skills in this program—how to be organized in collecting data, the importance of being careful when recording numbers or doing lab work, how to interpret the information obtained, how to use a computer for graphing and—especially—how to think logically and concisely.”

Lubbers is a member of the Botanical Society of America, the Kentucky Native Plant Society, the Ecological Society of America, and the Southern Appalachian Botanical Society. She holds a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and a Ph.D. from Duke University.

Email: anne.lubbers@centre.edu

File last updated: 8/5/13

Notes

EXPERT

Botany — Plant reproductive ecology — Invasive plants

A plant ecologist with expertise on factors affecting seed production in native plants. Articles published in the American Journal of Botany. Regularly involves her Centre students in collaborative research. Most recent work is on American ginseng; Lubbers and her students are studying how water availability, sunlight, and pollination affect the plant’s ability to produce seed. Interested in invasive plants and teaches one biannual course on plant-herbivore interactions.

Mark T. Lucas

Photo of  Mark T. Lucas
Alfred P. and Katherine B. Jobson Professor of English English Work Crounse Hall—404 Work Phone: 859.238.5263 Website: Personal Website: Website: Dr. Mark Lucas wins CASE Kentucky Professor of the Year
Biography

Dr. Mark Lucas, a three-decade veteran of Centre classrooms and mainstay of the English program, has been named the 2013 Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) Kentucky Professor of the Year—though anyone who has taken a class with him would not be surprised. Search the 2013 news archives for the complete story.

Mark Lucas has been the Jobson Professor of English at Centre College since 1999, where he has taught since 1981. His specialty in Southern literature has led to such Lucas traditions as the Grit Lit Barbecue and the annual senior-seminar pilgrimage to Faulkner’s birthplace.

Lucas has received Centre’s Hughes, Kirk and Panhellenic awards for excellence in teaching. He also has won a Sears Foundation Teaching Prize, an NEH Fellowship, and the Hartsell Award for teaching at the University of North Carolina.

Lucas is the author of The Southern Vision of Andrew Lytle (Louisiana State University Press, 1987) and editor of Home Voices: A Sampler of Southern Writing (University Press of Kentucky, 1991). He contributed to Fifty Southern Writers after 1900 (Greenwood Press, 1987) and the Companion to Southern Literature (Louisiana State University Press, 1998).

A 1975 graduate of Centre, Lucas holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is also an alt-country songwriter who has released four CDs with the now-defunct group BILLYBLUES. His most recent release was a solo project entitled Uncle Bones.

Email: mark.lucas@centre.edu

File last updated: 5/2/13

Notes

EXPERT: Southern literature, including William Faulkner — Kentucky literature — Contemporary songwriting

Author of The Southern Vision of Andrew Lytle (Louisiana State University Press, 1987) and editor of Home Voices: A Sampler of Southern Writing (University Press of Kentucky, 1991). Contributor to Fifty Southern Writers After 1900 (Greenwood Press, 1987) and The Companion to Southern Literature (LSU Press, 2001). Scholarly interest and expertise in Southern literature, especially Faulkner. Recipient of several teaching awards. Personal interest in Americana music.

M

Daniel L. Manheim

Photo of  Daniel L. Manheim
H.W. Stodghill, Jr. and Adele H. Stodghill Professor of English English Work Crounse Hall—446 Work Phone: 859.238.5325
Biography

Daniel Manheim is professor of English at Centre College, where he has taught since 1991. He has held the Stodghill Professorship for English since 2007.

Manheim has a scholarly background in American literature, and he has taught Centre courses on major American writers, environmental literature, American autobiography, and the modern short story. He has pursued research on American historian and philosopher Henry Adams and poet Emily Dickinson, among others, and his articles have appeared in such publications as The New England Quarterly, ESQ, and Literary Imagination.  He is on the board of directors of The Emily Dickinson International Society, and he edits the EDIS Bulletin.

Prior to joining the Centre faculty, Manheim was a visiting professor at Bard College and an instructor at Columbia University and Barnard College.

Manheim holds an A.B. from Amherst College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia.

Email: dan.manheim@centre.edu

File last updated: 3/18/14

Notes

EXPERT: American literature — The life and writings of Henry Adams — American autobiography

Scholarly background in American Literature. Has taught major American writers, African-American literature, American autobiography, and poetry. Expertise on American historian and philosopher Henry Adams.

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